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Amish Resources

Today, the Amish population in rural north-central Ohio, Wayne and Holmes counties, is approximately 35,000. Four major affiliations are represented in these areas including Swartzentruber, Andy Weaver, Old Order, and New Order (Wasao & Donnermeyer, 1996). The Amish have a strong commitment to the church and are led by bishops and ministers in numerous local parishes (DeRue, et al., 2002). Also, the Amish are strongly patriarchal and value loyalty to community and family, a strong work ethic, and practicing modesty (Cates & Graham, 2002).

Traditionally, Amish in need of mental health care and treatment went to members in the home and/or religious leaders, and used remedies like herbs, vitamins, prayer, and hard work in order to get rid of symptoms (Cates & Graham, 2002; DeRue, et al., 2002). However, Cates and Graham (2002) indicated that the Amish are starting to go to local community mental health agencies. In fact, the Counseling Center of Wayne and Holmes Counties has specifically developed programs and services sensitive to the Amish culture (DeRue, et al., 2002).

For more information on this survey and other Amish and mental health issues in rural areas, please visit the resources below.

Website Resources:

  • Amish Grace
    Amish Grace is a website that provides information about the book entitled Amish Grace: How Forgiveness Transcended Tragedy about the Amish school shooting in Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania that occurred in October 2006. The website provides information about religious beliefs, Amish practice, and religious notions of forgiveness.
    Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

  • Amish.Net
    Amish.Net’s website provides Amish Country information including descriptions of Amish people and history, and Amish culture.
    Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

  • Amish Studies: Young Center for Anabaptist & Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College
    Amish Studies is an academic website that provides the general public, students, and professionals, resources on Amish life and culture. The website includes information on Amish religious beliefs and rituals, social organization, cultural practices, population of Amish by state, and resources. Furthermore, the website identifies experts in Amish study, and research conducted and published by each expert.
    Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

  • Mennonite.net
    Mennonite.net website’s mission is to assist Mennonite churches and organizations create a presence on the World Wide Web. The website provides MennoWire which is an E-Wire News Service which provides up-to-date news stories pertinent to Mennonites.
    Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

  • National Committee For Amish Religious Freedom
    National Committee For Amish Religious Freedom website’s mission is to defend and preserve the religious freedom of the Old Order Amish religion in the United States. The website provides information on Amish history and culture and a section on frequently asked questions.
    Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

  • The Counseling Center of Wayne and Holmes Counties (CCWHC)
    CCWHC’s is a counseling center providing comprehensive and confidential mental health services in Wayne and Holmes Counties. The website provides information on counseling services, crisis intervention, specialized services for children, psychiatric services, rehabilitation and recovery services, and community education and prevention.
    Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

On-line Publications:


Articles:

Baron, M. (1997). Genetic linkage and bipolar affective disorder: Progress and pitfalls. Molecular Psychiatry, 2(3), 200-210.
Audience:Professionals

Carlson, G.A. (2005). Commentary: Where are the bipolar offspring? Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 44(11), 1111-1115.
Audience:Professionals

Cassady, J.D., Kirschke, D.L., Jones, T.F., Craig, A.S., Bermudez, O.B., & Schaffner, W. (2005). Case Series: Outbreak of conversion disorder among Amish adolescent girls. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 44(3), 291-297
Audience:Professionals

Cates, J.A. (2005). Facing away: mental health treatment with the Old Order Amish. American Journal of Psychotherapy, 59(4), 371-383.
Audience:Professionals

Cates, J.A. & Graham, L.L. (2002). Psychological assessment of the Old Order Amish: Unraveling the enigma. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 33(2), 155-161.
Audience:Professionals

Egeland, J.A., Hostetter, A.M. (1983). Amish study, I: Affective disorders among the Amish, 1976-1980. American Journal of Psychiatry, 140(1), 56-61.
Audience:Professionals

Egeland, J.A., Hostetter, A.M., & Eshleman, S.K. (1983). Amish study, III: The impact of cultural factors on diagnosis of bipolar illness. American Journal of Psychiatry, 140(1), 67-71.
Audience:Professionals

Egeland, J.A., Shaw, J.A., Endicott, J., Pauls, D.L., Allen, C.R., Hostetter, A.M., & Sussex, J.N. (2000). Prodromal symptoms before the onset of manic-depressive disorder suggested by first hospital admission histories. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 39(10), 1245-1252.
Audience:Professionals

Egeland, J.A., Shaw, J.A., Endicott, J., Pauls, D.L., Allen, C.R., Hostetter, A.M., & Sussex, J.N. (2002). Prospective study of prodromal features for bipolarity in well Amish children. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 42, 786-796.
Audience:Professionals

Johnson, C.C., Rybicki, B.A., Brown, G., D’Hondt, E., Herpolsheimer, B., Roth, D., & Jackson, C.E. (1997). Cognitive impairment in the Amish: A four county survey. International Journal of Epidemiology, 26(2), 387-394.
Audience:Professionals

Miller, K., Yost, B., Flaherty, S., Hillemeier, M.M., Chase, G.A., Weisman, C.S., & Dyer, A.M. (2007). Health status, health conditions, and health behaviors among Amish women: Result from the central Pennsylvania women’s health study (CePAWHS). Women’s Health Issues, 17, 162-171.
Audience:Professionals

Reiling, D.M. (2002). Boundary maintenance as a barrier to mental health help-seeking for depression among the Old Order Amish. Journal of Rural Health, 18(3), 48-436.
Audience:Professionals

Shaw, J.A., Egeland, J.A., Endicott, J., Allen, C.R., Hostetter, A.M. (2005). A 10-year prospective study of prodromal patterns for bipolar disorder among Amish youth. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 44(11), 1104-1117.
Audience:Professionals

Wasao, S.W. & Donnermeyer, J.F. (1996). An analysis of factors related to parity among the Amish in northeast Ohio. Population Studies, 50, 235-246.
Audience:Professionals

Books:

Donnermeyer, J.F., Kreps, G.M., Kreps, M.W. (1999). Lessons for living: A practical approach to daily life from the Amish community. Sugarcreek, OH: Carlisle Press.
Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

Hurst, C.E., & McConnell, D.L. (2010). An Amish paradox: Diversity & change in the world's largest Amish community. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.
Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

Kraybill, D.B. (2001). The riddle of Amish culture (2nd ed.). Baltimore: The John Hopkins University Press.
Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

Kraybill, D.B., Nolt, S.M., Weaver-Zercher, D.L. (2007). Amish grace: How forgiveness transcended tragedy. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

Kreps, G.M., Donnermeyer, J.F., & Kreps, M.W. (1997). A quiet moment in time. Sugar Creek, OH: Carlisle Press.
Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

Stevick, R.A. (2007). Growing up Amish: The teenage years. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.
Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

Umble, D.Z., & Weaver-Zercher, D.L. (2008). The Amish and the media. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
Audience: IndividualsFamiliesCommunityProfessionals

 
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